Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas in Print

  • Michael Yahgulanaas's new art piece SEI unveiled at Vancouver airport
    CBC News - July 9, 2015
    Visitors to Vancouver Airport's new luxury mall will be greeted by a 3,855 kilogram steel sculpture called SEI. The public art installation by acclaimed visual artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas is his largest work yet and one of his favourites. "Sometimes when I walk away from a project I'm never quite sure. I'm always thinking I could have done things differently. This one is a slam dunk," Yahgulanaas told The Early Edition's Rick Cluff. READ MORE...
  • Abstract form of jumping salmon unveiled at Vancouver International Airport mall
    The Vancouver Sun - July 9, 2015
    Artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas has designed a new stainless steel sculpture that recalls natural forms such as the curve of a jumping whale or salmon. The public art work is made from highly polished stainless steel. In contrast to those reflective surfaces is the underside of the 12-metre long sculpture which is covered in copper leaf. “Yes, it’s like a whale jumping or a salmon jumping,” Yahgulanaas said in a phone interview. READ MORE...
  • Pod People: Haida artist relies on talented Calgary fabricators to create his 5,500-kg whale sculpture
    Calgary Herald - June 12, 2015
    Stories about whales are generally epic, and this one, which starts with a napkin sketch and ends with the 5,500-kilogram creature making an overland voyage to the West Coast, is no exception. The whale in this case is a steel, copper-bellied piece of public art currently being installed outside the McArthurGlen Designer Outlet Vancouver Airport following a four-month gestation period in a southeast Calgary industrial park. READ MORE...
  • Exclusive sneak peek at Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas' latest work at McArthurGlen Designer Outlet Vancouver Airport
    The Georgia Straight - June 12, 2015
    You might not know his name, but if you've ever driven down Knight Street or passed by UBC's Thunderbird Winter Sports Arena, you've definitely seen his work. Contemporary artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas' latest piece, SEI, won't be unveiled until later this summer, but the Georgia Straight was invited to see the piece just as the finishing touches were being made. READ MORE...
  • 'Indigenous Beauty': a blockbuster Native American show at SAM
    Seattle Times - February 20, 2015
    To complement this big show, Brotherton has organized a smaller but still potent exhibition of Northwest Coast art drawn from local private collections. In addition to some exquisite old pieces in stone, silver and wood, there are contemporary contributions. A standout is “Red” by Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, a mural comprised of individual watercolors done in a powerful, graphic blend of Haida style and Japanese manga. READ MORE...
  • City of Kamloops Commissions Yahgulanaas Sculpture
    The Beat - December 8, 2014
    A sculpture commissioned from Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas by the city of Kamloops celebrates confluence of the North and South Thompson Rivers in Kamloops. This confluence goes on to form the largest tributary of the Fraser River. This new sculpture echoes of the exhilarating form of Yahgulanaas's 2010 sculpture at Thunderbird Arena at the University of British Columbia. READ MORE...
  • Meeting of the Rivers: Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas' sculpture in Kamloops
    The Vancouver Sun - January 15, 2014
    A sculpture by artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas for Kamloops that recreates the moment before the North and South Thompson join and become the single Thompson River was put together and raised for the first time Wednesday at a metal fabricating plant in Delta. Called Rivers, the soaring steel and aluminum sculpture is more than 10 metres tall. At the top, representing the two arms of the river, are stylized female swimmers in copper leaf. READ MORE...
  • B.C. Artist Brings Car-part Exhibit to Edmonton
    Edmonton Journal - November 26, 2012
    Some master stone and chisel, others conquer pigment and brush. In his copper-glowing artworks, Michael Nicholl Yahgulanaas is the planet's foremost expert on making art from the metal sunroof panels of 1992 Volvos. As glib as that description sounds, his "Haida Manga guy" work not only glows with beauty, but actually follows a trail of discussable substance going back to his days as a B.C. activist, author and cartoonist for underground political magazines. READ MORE...
  • Hot Art: Abundance Fenced by Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas
    Where Canada - April 6, 2012
    Vancouver's public-art scene just got a little edgier with "Abundance Fenced" by Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas. The First Nations artist fuses Northwest Coast motifs with Japanese graphics, which he's dubbed "Haida Manga." The sculpture, atop a retaining wall at the Knight Street and 33rd Avenue intersection, depicts orcas pursuing salmon and is inspired by the bountiful Fraser River salmon run of 2010. READ MORE...
  • Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas: Haida Manga Public Art
    The Vancouver Sun - December 2, 2011
    One of the city’s newest public art works is a 43-metre-long steel sculpture inspired by the record-setting 2010 Fraser River Salmon run. Abundance Fenced is located at Knight Street and 33rd Avenue along the top of a concrete retaining wall beside Kensington Park. It serves as a decorative railing beside the pedestrian path. READ MORE...
  • Sculpture Abundance Fenced Completed
    The Beat - October 9, 2011
    Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas has completed his City of Vancouver steel sculpture project. The title has changed from Bracelet of Abundance to Abundance Fenced. The work is currently being installed at Fraser and 33rd Avenue east in Vancouver. READ MORE...
  • Yahgulanaas’ The Bracelet of Abundance
    The Beat - June 3, 2011
    Haida artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas is preparing a new public sculpture for the city of Vancouver The Bracelet of Abundance. The stainless steel work will be placed on a retaining wall on Knight Street at 33rd Avenue East in Vancouver. “The bracelet is inspired by the unexpectedly abundant migration of salmon into the Fraser River in 2010. The Clark-Knight corridor links Vancouver to this river, one of the world’s most significant salmon runs,” says the artist. READ MORE...
  • Pacific Notion
    National Post - October 17, 2009
    Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas recalls stories he heard as a child of Haida fishermen pursuing northern fur seals across the Pacific Ocean on hunts that would last months at a time and take them as far away as the shores of Japan. They would make port of calls in Hokkaido or Hakodate, and, unlike the persecution they faced in Canada, there the men could "walk through the streets just like an ordinary human. They could go to the restaurant, could use public restrooms, they could shop and move freely and live freely as regular humans. Of course, that [was] not the situation here in British Columbia, in Canada, where if you're even allowed in the movie theatre you had to sit in the Indian side." READ MORE...
  • Vancouver's Thunderbird Arena Hosts New Aboriginal Artworks
    Vancouver Sun - September 16, 2009
    Take Off is the first time Haida manga has been turned into public, outdoor art.

    It is anchored to the ground by three steel pipes that arc to the west. They’re meant to mimic the motion of a mallard duck that quickly lifts up from the water as it takes flight. The birdlike part of the sculpture is made from recycled Volvo fenders and door with the profile of a hockey player painted in black acrylic in Haida-manga style. READ MORE...
  • Haida Art Hopes to Inspire Engagement
    The Ubyssey - November 9, 2007
    If you visit the Museum of Anthropology this month you'll be bumping into a parked Pontiac Firefly with a canoe tied to the roof. The piece, a part of artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas's new Meddling in the Museum exhibit, is more than just a fusion of the old and the new, though. Instead the exhibit is highly symbolic, dealing with the individual and cultural conciliation of settlers and indigenous peoples.

    On the carpet sits the gutted, copper-foiled, argillite-dusted Pontiac Firefly. Strapped to its roof is the traditionally designed and decorated Haida canoe. READ MORE...
  • Re-collecting the Coast
    The Georgia Straight - July 5, 2007
    The man who invented Haida Manga is standing in an improvised studio at the UBC Museum of Anthropology. Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas is positioned between his sculptural works in progress - two large, copper-coated "shields," which he will install outside MOA's front doors - talking about meeting places, middle places, and margins. "I'm trying to play the edge between the neighbourhoods," he says, indicating the way the interface between First Nations and colonial culture has shaped his current project - and his life. "I grew up that way. I was the only pale-looking Haida in the whole village... the only green-eyed, light-haired kid." READ MORE...
  • Haida Artist Hits it Big in Asia
    Vancouver Province - April 6, 2007
    Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas is a bird of many feathers. Formally trained in classical Haida design, the Vancouver resident has taken his considerable artistic talents along new paths with his unique form of "graphic narrative" called Haida Manga, essentially part-Haida and part-Asian. He takes Haida design and narratives and transforms them into socially relevant art. The object is to advance the Haida design traditions "to combat the simplistic narratives perpetrated about indigenous people of the Pacific Coast." He is already a big hit in Japan and Korea where manga - Japanese for comic - is a multi-billion-dollar-a-year business. And greater commercial success may just be around the corner. READ MORE...
  • Haida Manga
    Aboriginal Times - 2007
    One needn't be a high-powered business guru to succeed in the export industry - just ask Haida artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, who values artistic challenge far above sales charts and market analysis. That's not to preclude success, though - in the past two years, his sales have grown from zero to 100,000 units, earning him top-three ranking (August 2006) in Japan as an art importer. READ MORE...
  • Artist Portrait: Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas
    Galleries West - 2007
    It was a typical day at Vancouver's Museum of Anthropology. Patrons gazed at the west coast totem poles, the painted masks and carved feast bowls. Bill Reid's depiction of the Haida creation story, with Raven perched atop a clam shell, the first people crawling out below was in the background, and artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas explained how he was about to turn things upside down.

    "See this 27-foot canoe," he pointed at a boat carved in 1985 by Reid and others. "We're flipping it over and tying it to the top of an 11-foot Pontiac Firefly." READ MORE...
  • Haida Art, Then and Now
    Georgia Straight - June 8, 2006
    Amid the usual flurry of pre-exhibition activity at the Vancouver Art Gallery, painters, preparators, curators, all working in quick concert to prepare Raven Travelling for its public opening this Saturday (June 10), unusual cross-cultural elements emerge. Billed by the VAG as the most comprehensive exhibition of Haida art ever assembled, it is also a ground-breaker for that institution in terms of cooperation with a First Nations community. READ MORE...